Thornaby Medical Centre, TS17 0EE. Tel: 01642 751048
North Ormesby Health Village, TS3 6AL.Tel: 01642 225671

Contact Lenses

Contacts

Contact Lenses offer different people different things. Some people wear CLs for cosmetic purposes, while others wear CLs as they give them the freedom to pursue sports like rugby and football or other outdoor activities. In some professions spectacles can be a hindrance and contact lenses can overcome this. In certain instances CLs can also give better vision than specs.

As technology advances newer sophisticated materials are expanding the choice of lenses and the type of people who are suitable for contact lens wear. To find out if there is a type of contact lens suitable for you, please ask an optician. If you have asked previously and were told you were unsuitable this may no longer be the case so why not ask again?

What are contact lenses?

Contact lenses are small but powerful lenses that rest on the cornea of the eye and correct any refractive error the wearer my have. There are two main types of CLs:
Hard: Rigid Gas Permeable
Soft: Hydrogels & Silicon Hydrogels

Rigid Gas Permeable (RGP) Lenses

They are hard lenses partially made from silicon. Unlike old designs of hard lenses RGPs allow oxygen to travel through the lens allowing the eye to ‘breathe.’ Traditionally they have provided better vision, fewer complications and a longer lifetime when compared to soft lenses. However, they do not provide the initial comfort of a soft lens and wearing times have to be gradually increased until you are wearing them most of the time.

Soft Hydrogel Lenses

These are lenses made from ‘HEMA’ or similar plastics which hold water within the lens substance. The amount of water can make up to 90% of the lens and this gives the lens its comfort when on the eye. Soft hydrogels can either be: daily disposable (after wearing the lens for a day it is thrown away). monthly disposable (after wearing the lens it is cleaned and stored in solution but after either two, three or four weeks the lens is again thrown away). These are inferior lenses and as such we no longer offer them to new clients.

Silicone Hydrogel Lenses

Hydrogels made with silicon allow greater transmission of oxygen through the lens. This means that the eye will look and feel fresher at the end of the day when compared to normal hydrogels. There are fewer complications with silicone hydrogels and it doesn’t matter if you sleep in the lenses. In fact some silicone lenses can be worn for 7 days without being removed for cleaning.

Silicone hydrogels for extended wear are stiffer than traditional hydrogels so tended to be slightly less comfortable but as newer more advanced designs are introduced they are becoming more and more comfortable in comparison. If you have ever been told to stop wearing CLs due to complications caused by lack of oxygen, these lenses could give you another option.

I have astigmatism? Can I still wear CLs?

Astigmatism is when the eye focuses light in two different planes, instead of focusing light to a sharp point. This often happens when the front of the eye, the cornea, is not spherical (like a football) but is shaped elliptically (like a rugby ball).

Rigid Gas Permeable (RGP) Lenses

They are hard lenses partially made from silicon. Unlike old designs of hard lenses RGPs allow oxygen to travel through the lens allowing the eye to ‘breathe.’ Traditionally they have provided better vision, fewer complications and a longer lifetime when compared to soft lenses. However, they do not provide the initial comfort of a soft lens and wearing times have to be gradually increased until you are wearing them most of the time.

Soft Hydrogel Lenses

These are lenses made from ‘HEMA’ or similar plastics which hold water within the lens substance. The amount of water can make up to 90% of the lens and this gives the lens its comfort when on the eye. Soft hydrogels can either be: daily disposable (after wearing the lens for a day it is thrown away). monthly disposable (after wearing the lens it is cleaned and stored in solution but after either two, three or four weeks the lens is again thrown away). These are inferior lenses and as such we no longer offer them to new clients.

Silicone Hydrogel Lenses

Hydrogels made with silicon allow greater transmission of oxygen through the lens. This means that the eye will look and feel fresher at the end of the day when compared to normal hydrogels. There are fewer complications with silicone hydrogels and it doesn’t matter if you sleep in the lenses. In fact some silicone lenses can be worn for 7 days without being removed for cleaning.

Silicone hydrogels for extended wear are stiffer than traditional hydrogels so tended to be slightly less comfortable but as newer more advanced designs are introduced they are becoming more and more comfortable in comparison. If you have ever been told to stop wearing CLs due to complications caused by lack of oxygen, these lenses could give you another option.

I have astigmatism? Can I still wear CLs?

Astigmatism is when the eye focuses light in two different planes, instead of focusing light to a sharp point. This often happens when the front of the eye, the cornea, is not spherical (like a football) but is shaped elliptically (like a rugby ball).

Monthly Contact Lenses

We offer silicone hydrogel lenses as standard. These allow an incredible amount of oxygen to travel through, helping keep the cornea in optimum health.

Lens Materials Fees Total/month
Avaira £ 11.00 £ 10.00 £ 21.00
Biofinity £ 12.00 £ 10.00 £ 22.00
Biofinity Torics £ 15.00 £ 10.00 £ 25.00
Biofinity Multifocal £ 20.00 £ 10.00 £ 30.00
Acuvue Advanced £ 11.00 £ 10.00 £ 21.00